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[zz]Mozilla Contacts Helps Firefox Discover Your Social Web

2010/04/08
到目前为止,开明关系(http://www.kaiguanxi.net)收到反馈主要有两个。
先说不满意的:赶紧支持IE。嗯,我认为这个是重要但(相对)不紧急的任务,放一放吧。
另一个是非常让我高兴的,因为是对我之前摸索的肯定,那就是:方向和模式不错,新颖!
方向是什么?这就是!(看看下面Mozilla的动作吧,我正在和谋智接触,没准达成一个合作:比如说就是不支持IE,那可就巨NB了)
===============
2010年4月10日补充:

方向:人生最重要的不是所在的位置,而是所朝的方向。

同样是个B,你一路向北能变成NB;撞破南墙不回头,就只能当个SB

             
—网络经典段子

=========================

Mozilla
Contacts Helps Firefox Discover Your Social Web

Webmonkey Blog 作者:Michael
Calore


mozilla_labs

A new add-on for Firefox lets you take along one of your most
valuable digital assets — your address book — wherever you travel on the
social web.

The latest experiment to emerge out of Mozilla Labs, Contacts is a
Firefox add-on that stores all the contact information for all of your
friends on social networks and across multiple address books (both local
and web-based) in the browser.

An experimental alpha was first
announced in March
with the ability to pull in your contacts from
Gmail, Twitter and the Mac OS X address book. This week, Contacts
received its first update
, and can now import data from LinkedIn
and Plaxo as well. There are also stability improvements, and some new
discovery features that make it easier to find additional information
about people who are already in your address book.

In the blog post covering Contacts 0.2, Mozilla’s Michael Hanson says
his team is working quickly on adding support for other social
networks, Thunderbird’s address book and the Windows address book.

All of us social web junkies have felt the pain involved with
“finding friends” on new social networks, or of having to copy and paste
e-mail addresses from one place to another just to communicate with
somebody on a new web service, or on one we don’t frequently use.
Because of this, systems which make your address book, buddy list or
other “friend data” accessible across the web are becoming more vital.
They essentially give you the ability to sync all of your address books —
your own personal Rolodex, that vast store of extremely important data
you’ve been cultivating for years, and likely the only social network
it’s safe to say you’ll never abandon — and use them on any website you
visit.

There are two key components to Contacts. First is an e-mail
auto-completion engine, which will auto-complete e-mail addresses on any
website you visit without sharing any of your friends’ contact
information with the website. Second is an address book API which allows
a website to access your own personal contacts database stored in the
browser. Of course, you control which sites have permission to access
your contacts, and how much of your address book each site can see.

It’s important to note that Mozilla Contacts is still in the early
alpha stage, and will become more feature-rich as development continues.

picture-2

Another interesting component of Mozilla Contacts, introduced in
this most recent update, is its discovery engine. There’s a built-in
“Person search” tool. If somebody is already in your address book —
let’s say you know their name, e-mail address and Twitter handle — you
can search the web and collect any publicly available information about
them. So if they’ve made their phone number, alternate e-mail address
and a list of personal websites available, Contacts will add those
things to the person’s record in the database.

Contacts will also automatically discover Webfinger and hCard data
about anyone in your address book. The WebFinger integration is
especially helpful for anyone who has set up a Google Profile for
themselves, because Gmail addresses for people with public Google Profiles are WebFinger-enabled.

All of the data in your Mozilla Contacts is stored using the Portable Contacts
format, an emerging standard that promotes interoperability between
web-based address books.

These are significant advancements because, as we’ve argued before,
identity belongs in the browser. It’s the easiest place for a user to
control it, and since the browser is the primary place where users are
interacting with services that require authentication or some other
identity-centric action (geolocation, web forms) it makes sense to give
the browser the power to automate those tasks.

Also, e-mail addresses and URLs are fast becoming a convenient,
standard method of identifying one’s self on the social web. OpenID uses
the URL model, and think about all of the places you can log in using a
Gmail address. Mozilla understands this, and incorporates systems into
Contacts that allow you to collect information about somebody by
automatically accessing data stored at that person’s various personal
URLs and public profile pages. Also, by using Portable Contacts, Mozilla
is ensuring it’s as easy as possible for you to get data in and out
of Contacts.

In a way, Mozilla has been leading up to something like Contacts for
years, beginning with its Weave project for syncing
bookmarks, history and other personal data across multiple instances of
Firefox, and more recently with the Raindrop
web server. Weave and Contacts compliment each other nicely. We
wouldn’t be surprised to see them become integrated in the future.

See Also:

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